By Catherine J Frompovich

smart meter fires

Yet another AMI Smart Meter fire occurred on a Canadian house.  The smart meter damage cost the homeowner $5,000!

Listen carefully to what homeowner Kevin has to say about a power failure when you have a smart meter on your electric service.

It would be wise to turn off all appliances before the power comes back on, as the surge probably could do several damaging things: cause the meter to explode, or catch fire, or blow out and ruin household appliances—or all the above, especially those expensive ‘smart’ appliances that spy on you, which consumers seem to be addicted to, and also report back to big brother.

AMI Smart Meters are not built with surge arrestors, as the old and safe mechanical analog meters were.  Analog meters took electrical surges to ground, had no plastic parts and were made with metal and glass.

Hot sockets occur from retrofitting AMI Smart Meters onto former analog meter housings.  There can be an improper fit, which causes problems at the meter ‘jaws’ with hot sockets and arcing. [1]

Brian Thiesen explains utility companies declare meters are their property.  Try removing one and see what happens.  Utilities threaten arrest.  So, if that’s the case, shouldn’t utilities be responsible legally for all damages from AMI Smart Meters to homes and appliances?

Utilities cannot have it both ways: They own something homeowners cannot control, but when the utility company’s property (smart meter) causes damage, then it’s the homeowner’s liability.  Where are the public utility commissions, who are supposed to be working for consumers’ safety and welfare?

Are consumers aware their homeowners’ insurance policies won’t cover smart meter fires? Smart Meter Fire -Home Owner Paid $5000 In Damages  see video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDAOY3TswLw 

Reference:
[1] https://smartmeterharm.org/2015/11/13/how-hot-are-your-meters/

Resource:
Hot Socket Issues
http://www.techadvantage.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/LL1C_Tom_Lawton.pdf

Catherine J Frompovich (website) is a retired natural nutritionist who earned advanced degrees in Nutrition and Holistic Health Sciences, Certification in Orthomolecular Theory and Practice plus Paralegal Studies. Her work has been published in national and airline magazines since the early 1980s. Catherine authored numerous books on health issues along with co-authoring papers and monographs with physicians, nurses, and holistic healthcare professionals. She has been a consumer healthcare researcher 35 years and counting.